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Mandy Batjula Gaykamangu

Artist

Mandy Batjula Gaykamungu is a Gupapuyngu woman and daughter of esteemed community leader, Helen Milminydjarrk. Batjula lives and works alongside her mother and mothers sisters including senior artists Ruth Nalmarrkarra, Margaret Rarru and Helen Ganalmirrawuy. In 2017 Margaret Rarru recognised Batjula’s commitment to her weaving practice and gave permission for her to create works using Rarru’s iconic singular black. When create singular black works Batjula uses her own distinct weaving style.  

The daily routine at the camp of Batjula and her mothers is set by the rhythm of harvesting, preparing, dying and weaving bush fibres. Batjula is a young artist however the precision and detail of her work is of a standard usually attributed to the most senior of weavers. As well as being an accomplished weaver Batjula paints her clan designs associated with the Djankawu Sisters on bark, larrakitj (burial poles) and archival paper.

Depending on the session and ceremonial obligations Batjula lives and works between her grandmothers Homeland of Langarra (Howard Island) and Yurrwi (Milingimbi).

Batjula has recently delivered workshops in weaving and natural dye processes at the Makaratta, Milingimbi (2016) and Gattjirrk Festival (2016).

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Birth
19/05/1980

Clan
Gupapuyngu Gaykamangu

Languages
Gupapuyngu

Skin
Narritjan

Milingimbi Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation

The Milingimbi Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation is a community owned Art Centre that maintains an important position in the national art and cultural arena. Milingimbi Art and Culture has a long history of producing works steeped in active cultural practice such as barks, ceremonial poles, carvings and weavings. Works from Milingimbi are integral to important collections in many National and International institutions.

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A: Lot 53 Gadupu Rd, Milingimbi via Winellie, NT 0822
P: (+61) 8987 9888
E: [email protected]

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

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