Raymond Bulambula

Raymond Bulambula

Senior Artist / Director / Art Worker

Raymond Bulambula was born in Milingimbi and raised at Rapuma Island, his mother’s country, to the east. His father Djimbun was very old when Raymond was growing up and he was raised primarily by his four mothers and maternal uncle. When he was a young man, Raymond set off to his country and father’s country at Langarra Island and learned his sacred stories from his father’s nephews.

Raymond makes art from three tribes, the Burrnumbirr (morning star) belongs to his mothers side (Gurryindi), he also makes the Burrnumbirr from Mallarra side (grandson for Gurriyindi tribe). Most of his painting work comes from the Mandjikay, Wobulkarra side which belongs to Langarra. He paints mainly Latjin (mangrove worm and tree), Monuk Gapu (dirty salt and fresh water with bubles) which flows to from the creek to the sea and the Warraka (cycad) amongst others.

Image: Creative Cowboy Films

Margaret Rarru

Margaret Rarru

Senior Artist / Master Weaver

Margaret Rarru Garrawurra was born in the 1940’s in far north Arnhem Land into the Liyagawumirr people. She is one of a strong group of sisters of the renowned painter’s Mickey Durrng and Tony Dhanyala Garrawurra. Rarru’s artwork has been acquired by many galleries and museums including Queensland Art Gallery and features prominantly in the National Gallery of Victoria Collection.

In 2007 Rarru won the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award bark painting category, for her work Ngarra Body Paint Design, a subtle abstract of vertical triangles and circular waterholes on an irregularly shaped bark. Rarru lives with her family on her mothers country Langarra (Howard Island), off the coast of Arnhem Land, and at Yurrwi (Milingimbi Island). She is widely considered to be one of Australia’s most influential master weavers.

Wilson Ganambarr Manydjarri

Wilson Ganambarr Manydjarri

Senior Artist

Wilson was born in the bush at Gulnga, close to Arnhem Bay. He was taken to Yirrkala by his father as a young boy and was chosen to take over ceremonial obligations for the Datiwuy people as a young man. He has lived at Elcho Island and now resides at Milingimbi where he previously worked in the art centre as the boss for traditional materials harvesting. He is an extremely knowledgeable and powerful song man who paints intricate designs from both his mother and father’s estates.

Wilson has made art works for Buku Larrngay Mulka Art Centre and Elcho Island Art and Craft in the past and has travelled overseas to perform.

Joyce Naliyabu

Joyce Naliyabu

Senior Weaver / Art Worker

Joyce grew up on Burarra country at Yilan on the mainland to the west of Milingimbi, with her sister Gundurrupuy and renowned weavers and Angadjajiya (fish trap) makers Bonnie Burangarra and Lilly Roy. Nalyabu is a weaver of Daku (pandanus fish traps) Bathi (baskets/dilly bags) and Gayantha (mats). Joyce is one of the senior traditional owners of Gorriyindi country at the northern end of Milingimbi island, Rapuma island and significant parts of the Crocodile Islands group. Together with the Malarra and Gamalangka clans, the Gorriyindi call them selves the ‘three tribes’. Nalyabu is married to senior Wobulkara elder Raymond Bulambula and together they make Bunumbirr (morning star poles) from the Gorriyindi clan. Joyce is an art worker at the Art Centre.

Image: Creative Cowboy Films

Helen Ganalmirriwuy

Helen Ganalmirriwuy

Senior Artist / Master Weaver

Helen Ganalmirriwuy was born in Milingimbi and grew up on her mothers homeland at Langarra (Howard Island). She has seven fathers from Garriyak which is on the mainland south of Galiwin’ku. Helen has been weaving since she was a young girl and was taught painting by her family during the Ngarra (cleansing ceremony) during which clan designs are painted onto the body. Ganalmirriwuy is a master weaver who works daily with her sister, Margaret Rarru on  a diverse range of weaving designs such as Bathi Mul (black dilly bags), Pandanus mats, bags, baskets and and a variety of Balurr (bush string) works that exemplify her diverse knotting and weaving knowledge. Ganalmirriwuy’s work is characterised by its fine quality and striking dye patterns.

The three colours used for art production by the Liyagawumirr / Garrawurra clan are associated with Dj’ankawu sisters who travelled through North East Arnhem Land creating spring water, country, languages, tribes and culture amongst Yolgnu people. Ganalmirriwuy often paints the Bowarta (bush turkey) body paint design which signifies seniority in Liyagawumirr / Garrawurra ceremonial practice. It is best described as a ‘key hole’ design of yellow and red on a white background.

Helen Minminydjarrk

Helen Minminydjarrk

Artist / Weaver / Director

The name Milminydjarrk describes the sacred waterholes made by the Djankawu sisters as the punched their Dhorna in to the land at Garriyak. Helen’s grandfather Birriguy was a strong law man who taught his grandchildren ceremony and stories. After the death of her older brothers, Helen and her sisters have begun to paint designs associated with the Djankawu sisters.

Helen has been a teacher at Langarra Homeland at the school and has always engaged in teaching and passing traditional knowledge to younger generations. She currently works as an artist and as a supervisor for community employment programs.

Jack Roy

Jack Roy

Artist / Art Worker

Son of senior artists Lily Roy and Roy Rewa. Jack continues to paint and carve his Malarra clan designs. This includes Jack’s totem the Larratitja (barracuda).

Jack is one of the few remaining speakers of the Yan-nhangu language and features alongside his family in the highly acclaimed documentary film Big Boss: The Last Leader of the Crocodile Islands.

As well as being an artist Jack is an art worker at Milingimbi Art Centre. Jack’s main roles include material harvesting and cultural liaison.

Ruth Nalmakarra

Ruth Nalmakarra

Artist

Ruth was born in Galiwin’ku (Elcho Island), and grew up there until moving to Milingimbi in the late 1960’s. She has seven fathers from Garriyak which is on the mainland south of Galiwin’ku and sometimes lives and Langarra (Howard Island), her mother’s homeland. She has been weaving since she was a young girl. Ruth was taught painting by her family during the Ngarra cleansing ceremony time in which clan designs are used as body paint. Nalmakarra worked at the Milingimbi Art Centre as an assistant manager (2005-9) and also sat on the board. She has been an ANKA board member since 2007.

The three colours used for art production by the Liyagawumirr/ Garrawurra clan are associated with Dj’ankawu sisters who travelled through North East Arnhem Land creating spring water, country, languages, tribes and culture amongst Yolgnu people.

Image: Creative Cowboy Films

Judy Lirririnyin

Judy Lirririnyin

Artist

At the age of 12 Judy Lirririnyin sat with her father, renown artist Binyinyuwuy. She describes this as an important time in her life. “Yaka (no) playing around him. He was doing his painting to concentrate his mind. I was watching his hand moving down, going sideways – he was really tricky (clever). I was also watching my mother and grandmother doing weaving, making bathi and mat. So I learnt to sit quiet and to work carefully. Today I sit here with my painting, my brother in-law (brother) joins me, he sings the manikay for my painting, sometimes we are telling each other story for that painting and we cry.” Lirririnyin beams with pride as she speaks of her father and her mission to honour him and to continue sharing his memory and strength with her grandchildren.

Lirririnyin began painting her clan designs in 2016 after being inspired by the retrospective exhibition Art from Milingimbi: taking memories back, Art Gallery New South Wales. In 1993 Lirririnyin began working as a health worker, today she continues to work as part of the Strong Womens Program at the Milingimbi clinic.

George Milaypuma

George Milaypuma

Artist

George Milaypuma was inspired to share his culture through artwork firstly by watching his father, Gupapuyngu leader, Djawa. Djawa lead all aspects of the Milingimbi Community in the 1950’s including the highly respected and productive group of artist’s whose work was quickly collected by national and international institutions and collectors. Milaypuma says, ‘It is important to follow my fathers footsteps… our culture has been here for a long time and we need it to keep going.’ Djawa painted the complexities of Gupapuyngu law and ceremony with ochre on eucalyptus bark however it is Djawa’s stories of Mokuy Murayana that captured Milaypuma’s imagination.

Mokuy are ancestral beings that often feature in stories about the creation of Country, law and ceremony. Mokuy Murayana is a specific figure that is known for his lust for the most beautiful sounding yidaki (didgeridoo).

Milaypuma explains that he ‘went another way’ to his father, meaning that he does not paint onto bark but carves the Mokuy figures. These are made from cottonwood and are painted with ochre, their chests are decorated with Gupapuyngu clan designs. These are the same designs that Djawa painted onto the surface of bark and that all Gupapuyngu men, past and present, paint onto the chest of young boys during ceremony. These designs are inseparable from Gupapuyngu manikay (song) and bunggul (dance).

It is important to Milaypuma that his clan designs and law continue to capture the imagination of children as they grow and become adults. Milaypuma makes his work at home but is excited that all the djamarrkuli (children) get to see his work and remember the story for Mokuy Murayana when they visit the art centre.

As well as being an artist Milaypuma worked for the Crocodile Rangers as a Cultural Adviser since 2013.

Rosetta Wayatja

Rosetta Wayatja

Artist / Art Worker

Rosetta Wayatja is an emerging artist and committed Art worker at Milingimbi Art Centre. Rosetta begun work at the art centre in 2012.

From a young age Rosetta sat with her mother, Joyce Naliyabu, and her mother’s sister, Emma Gundurrabuy, whilst they weaved, this is how Rosetta leant how to harvest, dye and weave pandanus into beautiful objects.

George Dhangi

Senior Artist

George Dhangi is the son of Gupapuyngu Daygurrgurr man, Lipundja. Lipundja was at the forefront of art production in Milingimbi in the 1950’s when artwork from the region became highly regarded nationally and internationally by art galleries, collectors and museums. Artworks made by Dhangi’s forefathers form the foundation of Australian Aboriginal Collections across the globe. Today paintings made by Dhangi are reminiscent of the confident and loose style of his fathers generation.

Dhangi was taught his fathers clan designs, including niwuda or guku (Yirritja honey) by his older brother, Joe Djembangu, and his wife Daisy Namatja. Niwudu is of particular importance to Dhangi as the niwudu dreaming story originates from his clan estate of Djilwirri (Buckingham Bay). Niwudu is a sweet bush honey made by native bees and is found in small quantities in trees, hollow logs, under the ground and in ant beds. The Gupapuyngu honey design includes different coloured diamond shapes. Each colour represents the honeycomb in varied stages of development. The dotting used in this design represents the Murayana spirit as it was stung by the bees as he looked for their hive. During ceremony, the niwudu design is carefully painted onto the chests of Gupapuyngu Daygurrgurr men.

Dhangi also paints the stories of his mothers clan, notably the Wagilag Sisters. As the Djunugayi (caretaker) of his matrilineal clan he has the responsibility of caring for and ensuring maintenance of country and dreaming. The Wagilag Sisters represent a complex narrative that tells the story of the creation of Yolngu land and languages.

Dhangi started painting on bark in 2007. He says that painting helps him to remember his brother, sister in-law and old people now passed. He adds that painting is also a way for him to get rupee, to buy food and power card.

Keith Lapulung

Artist

Keith is from a tribal country called Garrata which belongs to the Djambarrpuyngu people in the interior of Buckingham Bay at the Gurala estate. Garrata is the site of the Bulmandji (shark) dreaming. Keith also paints stories associated with the Stone Dreaming (Gunda) called Burruwa which is only visible during low tide. Burruwa is the dwelling place of the two serpents known as Nyapili (common king brown snake) which belongs to that area. These themes are prevalent in Lapulung’s work along side the Gara (spear) mitji (design). Lapulung is also authorised to paint ceremonial designs such as the Burrutji (rainbow snake) belonging to the Yirriitja moiety Birrkili Gupapuyngu people, his mothers clan. He is theDjungkaya (custodian).

Keith is also a musician and founding member of the ‘Wirrinyga Band’ who continue to play at festivals and events nation wide after over thirty years. He is the Chairman of the Milingimbi Alpa store committee, Gatjirrk Festival Committee and Chairperson for the East Arnhem Shire, Local Authority.

Alfred Walpay

Senior Artist

Alfred Walpay is a Gupapuyngu man. He lives and creates his artwork on his mothers Homeland, Bodiya. Walpay has an intimate knowledge of natural materials. The artist harvests all of his materials on Milingimbi and nearby islands to create sculptural works that are underpinned with a deep understanding of the relationship between Yolngu, country and animals. Materials include; sledge grass, pandanus, balgurr, kakadu plum sap, cottonwood, feathers and natural pigments.

Margaret Matay

Artist

Matay was sitting beside her father Binyiyuwuy and watching him paint as a young girl. ‘I was watching him and helping him with his Gnurrungitj, Gamanungku, Miku, Mul, Buthalak (black, white, red, and yellow ochre); and changing his water and mixing his Djalkurrk (bush glue). I learned from him, watching his hands, watching him make brushes from dharpa (bark and wood) for background painting and he cut my hair for his fine brush.’

Margaret proudly continues to paint her father’s designs that include ‘Rain on the Trees’ and the Banumbirr (morning star) .

Joe Dhamanydji

Senior Artist / Chairperson / Art Worker

Dhamanydji is the youngest son of renowned artist and cultural leader Tom Djawa. He grew up in Milingimbi and has been painting since he was at school in the mission time. He was taught to paint his dreamings by his older brother. Joe makes works associated with the Buralla (Diving Duck), Yangurra (turtle), Gunatdarra (heron), Munbirri (catfish), Lumba-lumba (emu), Yuka (crab), Min- mindjark (water hole), Djanda/ Bininmirr (water goanna) and Djalunbu (hollow log coffin). He also paints designs associated with the Dja’nkawu Sisters from his mothers side.

Daryl Yatjany

Artist

Yatany is the the oldest son of senior Wobulkara man, Timothy Milingimbili and weaver Emma Gundurrupuy. He has been schooled in Wobulkara clan designs by his father and father’s brother, Raymond Bulambula.

Milingimbi Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation

The Milingimbi Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation is a community owned Art Centre that maintains an important position in the national art and cultural arena. Milingimbi Art and Culture has a long history of producing works steeped in active cultural practice such as barks, ceremonial poles, carvings and weavings. Works from Milingimbi are integral to important collections in many National and International institutions.

Contact us

A: Lot 53 Gadupu Rd, Milingimbi via Winellie, NT 0822
P: (+61) 8987 9888
E: [email protected]

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

© Milingimbi Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation

Follow us